Top 10 Tips to Ace Virtual Interviews

You have applied for your dream job and they have contacted you for an interview.  Surprise…it is a virtual interview.  You’ve never done one of them before and now you are getting nervous.
Virtual Interviews
Virtual interviews are becoming commonplace now to cut down on travel costs.  Usually, they are used for your first round and employers use them to get to know you and determine if they wish to move you to the next round of interviews.  But some companies are using them for second and third round interviews as well.  So it is important you are prepared for this type of interview and know how to use the technology.

Tips

So how do you make a good impression and ace the interview?  Here are a few tips to help”

1. Look at the Camera

By looking at the camera, the person on the receiving end thinks you are looking at them.   If you are watching the computer screen it appears you are looking at the keyboard and not paying attention.  If you want to watch yourself onscreen, move the box closer to the top near your camera lens.  This also cuts down on drastic eye movements.

2. Lighting

Make sure you have sufficient light in the room where you will be interviewing.  The interviewer will want to see you, not shadows.

3. Dress Professional

Dress for an interview from head to toe.  If they ask for something and you need to get up to get it, you will look ridiculous if you are only dressed professionally from the waist up.

4. Grooming is Essential

The interviewer will probably see you up-close on the screen.  Most likely closer than they would during a regular interview, it is important to make sure you have taken some time to groom yourself.  Comb your hair, brush your teeth, floss, remove unwanted facial hair, and use some light make-up if female.

5. Background is Important

Set your computer or phone up in front of a calm area without distracting things in the background.   Everything they see will shape what they think of you.  Don’t skip this step.  I have heard of candidates who did not get jobs because of all the clutter in the room.

6. Colors to Wear

While you want to be professional, you also want to wear colors that complement your complexion and are not too busy on the screen.
  • Refrain from polka dots or busy prints.
  • Stick with solid colors if possible.
  • Avoid white, bright red and all-black outfits. All three of these colors pose technical problems.
  • Jewel colors show up best.
  • Keep jewelry simple.

7. Sounds

We talked about distracting visual backgrounds, quiet the noise.  Sounds can be distracting to you and the interviewer.

8. Speak Clearly

Now is not the time to mumble.  Make sure you practice speaking clearly and loud enough so the interviewer can hear you.

9. Important Documents

Have a copy of your resume next to you, as well as paper and pen to take notes, and some pre-written interview questions (At least two) that you want to ask them.  Treat this the same as an in-person interview.

10. Practice

Do a few trial-runs with someone to see how you look, sound, and how comfortable this interviewing format is.   It helps to use the technology in advance so you feel confident.  It IS unnerving, so to rock out, you need to try to practice to feel comfortable and shine.
Follow these tips and you should have a great virtual interview.

Do You Need More Help?

If you would like more help preparing for a virtual interview, consider working with me, your Career Coach, Rachel Schneider, at Career Find.  We can schedule a meeting to create a resume that will differentiate you from other candidates and practice virtual interviewing.

Are You Dreaming of Early Retirement?

Do you dream of early retirement?  Many people do.  Thinking about retiring early and not following someone else’s schedule is appealing.

Early Retirement

As many young people dream of retiring early, there are many  workers in their 50’s and 60’s that wonder if it will be possible to retire at regular retirement age.  Some feel they will need to work till 70 and beyond.

What about you?

Are you interested in exploring an early retirement?

Early retirement is possible but it requires planning, sacrifices now, and focus on a long term goal.   Planning from the perspective of finances and all the perks that come with having a full-time job such as vacation time, sick time, health insurance, etc.   Will you replace them and if so, how?

FIRE Movement

There is a current movement toward Financial Independence, Retire Early (FIRE).

Greg Daugherty, a Personal Finance Writer, who has researched people who retired in their 30’s, points out the three steps to make early retirement a reality:

  • Embrace a frugal lifestyle.
  • Save like crazy­ – 75 percent or more of your income — and invest the money.
  • Once your investments are sufficient to support that very frugal lifestyle for the rest of your life, consider yourself free to retire.

The FIRE movement is not for everyone.   If you have children or other responsibilities, saving 75% of your income might be impossible.  So are you doomed to work till you are 70?

You don’t have to retire in your 30’s.   Making adjustments when young can allow you to at least be on track to survive leaving your job at normal retirement age or to perhaps retire 5 or 10 years early.

Small Adjustments

Some adjustments that are easy to implement now no matter what age you currently are:

  • Earmark any raises, bonuses, and tax returns to go directly to savings.
  • Buy used cars instead of new and invest the difference.
  • Learn to cook so you will spend less on meals out and eat healthier.
  • Take care of your health. It is easier to retire healthy than if you have a lot of medical issues that will make insurance expensive.
  • Learn to live with less. You don’t have to make drastic cuts but small cuts to expenses every month add up.  Do you need all those extra cable stations, do you need a new cell phone, do you need the latest tech, are those designer clothes a must?   Little savings add up.
  • Cut back on luxury vacations.
  • Research costs of things such as health care, etc. so you are prepared and don’t have sticker shock after you quit your job.
  • Invest the money you save so it works for you.
  • Plan ahead. Do you want to retire 5 years early, 10 years?   How much money will you need?

Sometimes retiring early doesn’t mean you stop working.  It means you no longer work the job that is currently paying the bills.  It might mean you now have the time to work on your own schedule.  Maybe you now have time to start your own business or work for a non-profit that you are passionate about on a part-time basis.

Mr. Money Mustache, a financial writer states, “Financial independence is not an age-related concept,” he says. “It simply means your income from sources other than work is enough to pay for your lifestyle.”   Those sources can vary from pensions, savings, passive income, to part-time work.

It Is Possible

Whatever you are dreaming retirement will be, just know it is possible.  But to make it a reality you need to plan ahead and make some changes now while you are employed to make it happen.

Things to Consider Before Applying for a Non-Profit Job

If you’re ready to leave the corporate world behind and look for a job with a non-profit, you may think it’s a great shift. But the needs of a non-profit are very different from that corporate job you’ve been working. Before you send out your resume, there are a few roadblocks that may keep you from getting hired.

non profit

Here’s what you need to consider before applying for a non-profit job:

Thinking the Job Will Be Easy

Maybe one of the reasons you want to leave the corporate world is because you’re feeling overworked and underappreciated. While the non-profit world will probably appreciate you more, you don’t know the meaning of overworked yet.

Most people take a job with a non-profit because they’re passionate about the cause. This usually translates to working as much and as often as they possibly can to support their non-profit organization. Weekends and 12-15-hour days are pretty normal.

Not Volunteering

If you’re applying for a non-profit position without ever volunteering your time, hiring managers are going to question your commitment to the organization’s mission.

If you say you care deeply about an issue but you don’t have any volunteer experience, that’s a red flag. If you truly care about the mission, volunteer first and prove you’re committed to their mission.

Assume It’s Not a “Real” Business

While non-profits are deeply committed to their cause, they also want to hire people who can manage their staff and volunteers, cut costs, and raise money. If they’re going to spend the money to hire someone, they want someone with management and financial skills.

Thinking Too Highly of Your Skills and Experience

You may think that because you earned your skills in the corporate world that they are superior to the skills you would’ve earned in the non-profit world. Most people who work for non-profits are professionals who have worked their way up and have strong experience.

While it’s important to be confident about your skills during your interview, it’s also important that you not underestimate the skills of the other people already working at the non-profit.

Being Seen as a Stand-Out

In the corporate world, your successes are usually your own. But in the non-profit world, successes are about the team. It’s important to be seen as a team player in your interview, otherwise, you can kiss that non-profit job good-bye.

Highlight your experiences with people you worked with in the past and share successes that the whole team enjoyed.

Non Profit Tips

To ensure a successful interview for a non-profit position take these tips to heart:

  • Use a chronological resume to highlight your job growth from one position to the next.
  • Customize your resume to the position you’re applying for instead of submitting a generic resume.
  • Show that you understand and connect with the non-profit’s mission by doing some research on them before going to your interview.
  • Share how you have the ability to work with others to resolve a problem and find a solution.
  • Show that you care about their mission by volunteering for their group or another similar group before submitting your resume.

Working in the non-profit world is not for the person who wants a Monday-Friday, 9-5 job. It requires a lot of hard work and commitment. Know what you’re signing up for before wasting both your time and that of the interviewer.

Still Interested?

If working for a non-profit still sounds like a good fit for you, consider working with me, your Career Coach, Rachel Schneider, at Career Find.  We can schedule a meeting to create a resume that will differentiate you from other non-profit job seekers and develop a job search strategy to help you feel confident as you meet with various non-profits.

5 Areas of LinkedIn Job Recruiters Use to Screen Applicants

Would it surprise you to know that social media has become an almost universally adopted hiring tool, with 92 percent of recruiters surveyed using it as part of their interview and hiring process?   Of the various social media, LinkedIn comes out on top with 87 percent of recruiters using Linkedin.  Fifty-five percent are using Facebook, and 47 percent are using Twitter.

LinkedIn Use in Job Search

Recruiters are searching more than just your profile, they are giving it a thorough review for not only qualifications but to learn a little more about an applicant’s personality.

Screening Applicants

Here are the top things job recruiters look at when screening applicants:

1. Is Your Profile Completed?

If your profile is incomplete, it probably means you don’t give much thought to how you present yourself to others. It makes a bad first impression. Your profile should be your online resume showing your previous and current places of employment with accurate start and end dates.

You should also include a summary of your qualifications, awards, work history, and skills along with a recommendation or two. Your summary should be short, concise, and easy to read with bullet points.

Make the most of your headline, it’s your first profile impression. Check for discrepancies, they can be a red flag to employers that you’re not detail-oriented.

2. Your Photo

Is your photo a professional headshot or a selfie? Are you wearing professional attire or dressed casually while at the beach? Is it a close-up or just a dark shadow in the background? Your photo represents who you are in the business world, not on vacation.

It should represent the job you’re seeking. If you can’t afford to get a professional headshot, dress in business attire and have a friend or family member take a photo of you against a solid color background.

3. Your Connections

The more connections you have, the more a job recruiter sees that you are a networker and make connections that can improve your knowledge and referrals. If you have less than 300 connections, you need to take some time to beef up your profile and connect with more people.

4. Your Activity

During a job search, recruiters want to see that you’re active on LinkedIn. Are you reading your news feed, sharing content, and commenting regularly? This will show a recruiter that you have a level of professional interaction with your connections.

If you’ve written articles, be sure to include links to them in your profile so that recruiters can learn more about you. Keep any content you post professional, this is your online image.

5. Your Status

If you’re currently seeking a new position, using the “ Open Candidates ” option will allow you to privately let recruiters know that you’re searching. If recruiters know this in advance, they are more likely to send opportunities your way.

Job Recruiters Take Your Profile Seriously

Job recruiters take your LinkedIn profile seriously so you need to as well if you want to grab their attention.  Spending an afternoon updating your profile is time well spent if you’re looking for a new job.  You can make it easier for recruiters to find you by joining industry groups and commenting on discussions. Recruiters are always seeking professionals within their industry to connect with.

Rate Your Workplace Happiness

This is the time of year when new initiatives are starting, bonuses are often paid, and things get into a routine at work.  It’s a perfect time to look at your workplace happiness.  Do you “love” your job?   If not, it might be time to take inventory and consider your options.
Workplace Happiness
More than a third of all workers are planning to move to a different job during the next year.  Will a new job live up to expectations, or will they be back to hunting the perfect job in just a few months?

Evaluating Your Job Happiness

Before jumping ship and switching jobs, look inside yourself and evaluate what exactly you are unhappy about.   What criteria do you need to use to make sure the next job makes you happier?   Is there anything you can do to improve your job happiness with your current employer?

Personality

Take your personality into consideration. Do you enjoy social interactions and communication or is working with smaller groups or by yourself more your thing?  Can you concentrate for long stretches of time on a single thing, or do you like constant change?   Is your current occupation using your strengths or tugging at your weaknesses?

Understanding your personality traits will help you to recognize which working environments are best suited for you.  Work environment plays a big role in your happiness at work.

Skills

Next, let’s look at the skills you enjoy using.   Do you like to work with numbers or words?   Do you like to do research?  Are you a problem solver?   Are you strategic?   What skills make you feel energized when you use them?  What skills drain you?

Work Requirements

All jobs have requirements and we might not like all of them, and it is something to take into consideration when looking at a new position.   Do you like working 9-5 or do you want more flexibility?   Do you want to set your own schedule or work when you are assigned?  Do you want to come into an office or work from home? Are you required to do mandatory overtime?  How often do you have to stay late?

Studies have found that people who work 40 hours or less are usually happier than peers who are working 40+ hours.   If you work long hours you have less time for family and friends.  Unrealistic work demands can decrease employee happiness.

Challenge

Do you have the opportunity to learn new things?   Does your current job challenge your mind on a routine basis or is it routine?   Most people enjoy a bit of challenge.

Money

Some of the happiest employees make very little in comparison to some of the high paying jobs available.  You have heard the saying, “Money isn’t everything.”  While that is true, money is important.  You should be paid fairly for the job you are doing.  Wages and benefits have an impact on your happiness with the job.

While a six-figure salary may appear to make a person happy, if it eats up all their time and is constantly stressful it might not be worth it.  Many will pick a lower salary for more freedom and time away from the job.  Money is not an indicator of job happiness but is something to consider.  More money does not always make a person happier but being underpaid certainly contributes to job unhappiness. Only you can answer the questions regarding how much money contributes to your job happiness.

Other Factors

Other factors that contribute to job happiness include:

  • Relationship to co-workers
  • Treatment of employees
  • Job Security
  • Safety
  • Organization’s stability
  • Relationship with immediate supervisor
  • Communications
  • Culture
  • Future opportunities
  • Training
  • Support and recognition
  • and others

As you take inventory of these items and how they contribute to your workplace happiness, you might find you are not happy and want to make a shift.  Utilizing a coach for career guidance may help you find the perfect job that would be a better fit for your personality.

Let Me Help

If you need help preparing for the job-hunt, contact your Career Coach, Rachel Schneider, at Career Find for an Introduction Call.  I can help you create a resume that will differentiate you from the competition, develop a unique job search strategy, and help you to feel confident as you begin the interviewing process.

 

Remove the Stress From Job Hunting

Hunting for the perfect job for an individual requires time, effort and knowledge. Sometimes we get stressed with the amount of time and effort involved with the process of job hunting.  Has this ever happened to you?

Job Hunt

Steps to Remove the Stress

For stress-free job-hunting, every individual must first consider the following pointers before starting your job hunting process:

  1. Know what type of job you would like to apply for. Attending job fairs that offer work which is not related to one’s degree or work preference would be a waste of time.

Consider your interests, preference of work location and job shifts.  If all these fit the category of the job opening available, then consider applying.

  1. Prepare possible needed documents or career portfolio. Have several copies of your resume, transcript of records and any certifications or reference letters ready for immediate submission if needed.

Waiting until you get the call to get these items updated and together just adds to the stress.   Be prepared in advance.

  1. Know where to look for job postings.    Below are some ideas:

*Internet.

One of most widely used searching options is the Internet.  Aside from the fact that browsing the Internet for available jobs is less time consuming than personal appearances to inquire at the offices, this can also be the least productive form of job hunting.

* Newspapers

Local newspapers advertise jobs that are within an applicant’s commuting distance.  Available jobs are usually printed on a regular basis.

*Career or Job Centers

Depending on where you live, you may have a center in your community.   They work with employers to keep an updated list of jobs available.

*Trade Periodicals or magazines

Professionals are best advised to look for jobs in magazines/journals since employers that would want to hire the same would advertise in such journals.

*Offices

Most companies have postings of job openings on their website with instructions on how to apply.

*Friends 

Friends are a great source of available jobs especially if they already work there and can put in a good word for you to get an interview. Just a word of caution, don’t expect to get the job just because you have a friend working there.  Do your due diligence and research to make sure this is a good fit for you and you are prepared to go through the interview process just like everyone else.

Searching for a job will always include some level of stress but you can do your best to minimize it and help yourself be a confident job-seeker.

If you need help preparing for the job-hunt, contact your Career Coach, Rachel Schneider, at Career Find and schedule a meeting to create a resume that will differentiate you from other job seekers and develop job search strategy to help you feel confident as you begin your job search.

Be Prepared When Disaster Strikes

I live near Houston, Texas.   Never in my wildest dreams would I have imagined the wrath of Hurricane Harvey on my area.   I thought I lived in a very safe zone, but I had to evacuate.  My home ended up being OK, but several homes close to me had water damage.

So how do you prepare for something like a hurricane or other disaster?  Even if you live in a safe zone, you need to be prepared with some items ready-to-go at a moments notice.

After living through the Harvey evacuation, I would like to share a couple items to gather together so you are prepared no matter what the emergency.

Prepared When Disaster Strikes

Create and Evacuation Box or Backpack

Creating an evacuation box or backpack will be so helpful for you and for your family.

Include the following items in your evacuation box:

  • Copies of important documents. (Copies can also be saved in Dropbox or Evernote for retrieval)
    • Bank and credit card account info
    • Mortgage company info
    • Computer account info
    • Insurance policies
    • Driver’s license
    • Social Security Card
    • Passport
    • Copy of your electric bill to prove where you live
    • A sheet listing any phone number you might need during an emergency such as insurance agent, family, minister, etc.  (it also helps to pre-program these on your phone)
    • Copy of birth certificates or citizenship papers
  • Your checkbook
  • A backup external hard drive of your computer’s info, pictures, etc.
  • A thumb drive with all versions of your resume on it (These can also be saved in Dropbox or Evernote for retrieval later)
  • Extra keys to your safe deposit box
  • Flashlight and batteries
  • Some extra cash
  • Phone and Charger

Each of these items should be sealed in ziplock baggies to avoid water damage, etc.

Other Items

Depending on where you live, you might want to include other contents.

I would suggest a couple bottles of water be packed as well.

Don’t forget to pack your medications in ziplock bags too.  Make sure you have enough to last a week.

Babies

If you have babies, make sure you have diapers, wipes, baby food, formula, etc. packed to take in a rush.

Pets

If you have pets, you may want to have a bag packed for them for emergencies that includes little bowls, some pet food, an extra leash and doggie-waste bags.

If You Evacuate:

Hopefully, you will never have to evacuate but if you do, please know a dozen people will be there to help. You may feel alone, but your neighbors, friends, first responders will be there to help you.

  • Wear shoes that can get wet.
  • If you travel, call your credit card companies and banks so your card/account is not subject to a fraud hold.
  • Contact FEMA and The Red Cross to help with expenses, etc.
  • Contact your insurance agent.
  • Contact family and let them know you are safe.

What You Will Need in The Aftermath:

If your home is involved in a disaster you will need the following items when it is time to return and clean up.

  • Trash bags
  • Cleaning supplies
  • Mops
  • Brooms
  • Camera or cell phone camera for pictures of damage
  • Storage bins for things you can salvage
  • A pair of rain boots

Save all receipts.

Be Prepared for a Quick Getaway

Being prepared to make a quick getaway will not only make the evacuation stress less, but also you will have less stress once you have gotten to a safe place.   It helps you to re-status yourself in the event the catastrophe does strike.

I Was Lucky

My home is out of the floodplain and was totally safe until County officials decided that I was going to get 4 feet of water in my house and needed to evacuate ASAP.

It was quite the experience having to sort through unpacked boxes (we moved in 2 weeks prior) and decide what I definitely didn’t want to lose and what could be lost.

After a week, we were allowed back into our area and were very lucky to find no water in the house.

The neighborhood next to mine was not so lucky. For some reason, the flood gates remained closed, and the pump station did not turn on which caused the retention ponds to fill and overflow 2+ feet into homes. Hundreds of homes were damaged.

If You Want To Help

If you want to help actual people and families that lost everything instead of giving to a charity that takes a cut, please email me (rachel@yourcareerfind.com) and I will let you know how you can directly help them.  I have friends from out of state who sent gift cards to me, I then distributed to people that have no flood insurance and had their home flooded in the neighborhood next to mine. This cuts out the middle man and gets much-needed help to families immediately.

 

 

Why Your Handshake Matters – Job Interview Tips

The importance of a handshake is much more than you can imagine.  While a handshake is a nonverbal form of communication, don’t be fooled by thinking “it” doesn’t speak volumes about the person shaking hands.

Having a good handshake can mean the difference between getting the job or not.  Decisions are made about our personality and character based on a handshake all the time, which is why it is so important that YOU master the art of handshaking.

Your Handshake matters

No matter how well prepared you are for the interview, if your handshake is bad, your first impression will take a hit. But the right handshake will do far more for you than designer clothes ever could. So save your money and learn a bit more about the art of handshaking.

Four Types of Handshakes To Avoid

Don’t lose points with someone you are trying to impress before opening your mouth!

The Wimpy Noodle: This one is particularly common among women, but it’s perhaps the worst—a limp, lifeless hand extended and just barely shaken. It’s the type of handshake that can ruin a meeting before it even begins.

The Hand Crusher: This grip can actually make the other person wince in pain.  Some have been taught that the stronger their grip, the more seriously they will be taken—and they clamp down as if their life depended on it.  Be careful of your own strength.

The Alpha: In this case, the hand is extended palm down—seems subtle, but it conveys the intention of having the upper hand in the interaction.

The Double-Handed Clench: The classic two-handed handshake (also known as The Politician’s Handshake)—when you feel your partner’s left hand closing in on your right hand, wrist, arm, shoulder, or neck. The only time this is OK is when the person you’re meeting is already a good friend (and even then I’d reserve it for those times when you want to convey special warmth).

The Steps to a Good Handshake

Follow these steps to learn the key ingredients of a gold-star handshake.

  1. Be Prepared

When meeting people, keep your right hand free. Shift anything you’re holding to your left hand well in advance—you don’t want to have to fumble at the last moment.

  1. Consider Your Body Language

 If you’re seated, always rise before shaking someone’s hand. If you’re standing, keep your hands out of your pockets—visible hands make you look more open and honest.

Face the person and make sure to use plenty of eye contact, and smile warmly.

  1. Get in Position

Angle your thumb straight up to the ceiling when reaching to shake a hand. Open wide the space between your thumb and index finger.

  1. Make Contact

Give a hug with your hand.

  1. Shake It

Shake from the elbow, not the wrist.

  1. Practice, Practice, Practice

Practice with friends or family before a job interview or networking event.

A Fortune 500 CEO once said that when he had to choose between two candidates with similar qualifications, he gave the position to the candidate with the better handshake.  Make sure you have the best handshake possible.

Learn More!

Check out the great information about handshakes  in the infographic below:

Infographic by Quill

Need some help?

Call your Career Coach, Rachel Schneider at Career Find and schedule a meeting to differentiate yourself from other applicants as you move forward with your job search.

Interview Skills to Land Your Dream Job

Job interviews can be some of the most important meetings you’ll ever have. If the job you’re applying for is your dream job, it can cause some added stress and pressure because you want to make sure you do exceptionally well.

Interview Skills

Being prepared and presenting yourself as confident and capable is the best way to ensure a successful interview.

Tips

Here are a few great tips for acing the meeting that could lead to your dream job.

Be Prepared

Study the company you’re applying to and the position you’re interviewing for. Research them through their website, blog, and social media posts. Be sure to read the “About Us” area of their website. Know a little something about their history, what they do and any new developments or plans that have been announced.

Practice

Prepare your answers in advance to some of the most common interview questions. Repeat your answers over and over again in front of a mirror so that you can also practice your body language and posture. This practice will help you appear more confident, even if you’re a nervous wreck inside.

Choose Your Outfit

Know at least the day before what you plan to wear to your interview. Last minute running around and changing clothes will not only make for a stressful morning, but you’ll feel less confident if you’re not wearing something you like. Plan your outfit in advance right down to your shoes and accessories. Lay it all out and make sure it’s wrinkle-free so on interview day you’re ready to go.

Ask Questions

When you have questions to ask of the interviewer, they know you are prepared and have thought about your potential new position and the company you want to work for.

Don’t Get Cozy

Sometimes, when we start to feel comfortable with someone, we relax and become familiar like we’re making friends. This is great if you’re making a new friend, but not so good for a professional interview. Remain positive and enthusiastic about the position while maintaining professionalism.

Listen

Practice your listening skills and pay attention. Your interviewer is providing you with a lot of information about the potential job and employer. This will help you to ask good questions later in the interview.

Practice Good Body Language

Smile, make eye contact and greet your interviewer with a firm handshake. This great first impression will get your interviewer interested in learning more about you.

By preparing yourself in advance and maintaining a professional appearance throughout your interview, you’ll find yourself at the top of the selection list for the new job!

Need some help?

Call your Career Coach, Rachel Schneider at Career Find and schedule a meeting to create a resume that will differentiate you from other job seekers and develop a non-traditional job search strategy to help you feel confident as you begin your job search.

9 Things Employers Look For In New Graduates

Are you a soon-to-be new graduate looking for a job?

Many of today’s graduates are told they should look for jobs specifically in the area of their college major.   This is old advice that is no longer valid.

9 Things Employers Look For In New Grads

Skills and knowledge are transferable.  Graduates have a leg up on other applicants when they can plug their knowledge into different areas, show employers they are flexible and do the job regardless of their major.

In the past, people felt learning a particular skill was important for landing the job.  Now employers are looking more for the whole package.  Yes, you must have basic skills and knowledge in the area, but other things play a big role in the hiring process.

Employers Want

Employers look for candidates with:

  • A willingness to learn and try new things
  • An ability to work with others
  • Great communication skills (both written and verbal)
  • Leadership
  • An ability to handle change
  • Responsibility and self-motivation
  • An awareness of strengths
  • An ability to think outside the box
  • A desire to grow with the company

Showcase Your Skills

Showcase what you can do and what you have been involved in on your resume. Don’t feel you are limited to work experience.  If you are a new grad, employers will expect to see college activities and leadership in such activities as part of your resume.

You might be surprised what the employer will find valuable.   I know a person with an engineering background that was hired because of their social media knowledge to help promote the company.  I also know a graduate who was scooped up by a radio station as an on-air broadcaster because he had worked for his college radio station and had a superior work ethic.

Keep an Open Mind

Don’t pigeonhole yourself into one certain job.  Keep an open mind when applying for roles and during the interview. Show the employer how YOU can be an asset to the company.

Need some help?

Call your Career Coach, Rachel Schneider at Career Find and schedule a meeting to create a resume that will differentiate you from other new graduates and develop a non-traditional job search strategy to help you feel confident as you begin your job search.

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